5 Best Finger Picks ­- The Right Tool For The Job

Finger picks are a rather obscure accessory for anyone who is not an avid acoustic guitar player. Even then, only those who prefer the finger style are likely to be familiar with these picks. Today we are going to give you a short intro to finger picks, explain what they are used for and show you some of the best choices on the market. If you are interested in mastering the finger style technique, having one of these picks can help you get there faster and easier.

What Void Do Finger Picks Fill?

Playing finger style is on a whole different level as far as technique goes. With a standard pick, you are looking at a fairly uniform movement that is pretty straight forward. Once you remove that pick from the equation, it becomes much harder, with fine motor skills being involved even more. Each finger has a job to do and you have sync all of those actions perfectly. In a sense, finger style is challenging in its own way, which is why so many guitar players are attracted to it.

The problem is that fingers on their own aren’t really a great pick. The standard at the moment is to grow your nails, shape them as you’re growing them and use them to pick individual strings. This can be too much for some people as having long nails can make day to day life quite uncomfortable. One solution for this problem are finger picks. A finger pick is nothing more thana piece of metal or composite material which is shaped to form a ring piece with a pick on one end. By using a finger pick, you don’t have to grow nails nor suffer discomfort that is implied.

How To Choose A Finger Pick?

Finger picks, just like regular picks, come in different formats. Material used is an important factor. Most popular choices in this regard are metal and various composites. Former gives a much more aggressive, snappier tone while the latter is soft and mellow. Then there is the matter of pick gauge. This works much like it does with standard picks. Thicker gauges are stiffer and sharper while thinner picks are soft and flexible. Figuring out which one of these attributes worksfor you simply takes some trial and error. There is no manual to follow, so just get yourself a variety and experiment. Now that we know a little about finger picks, lets check out some great.

Image Finger Picks / Rating Summary Check Price
+ - Dunlop 37R.018 Brass Fingerpicks Dunlop 37R.018 Brass Fingerpicks

Total of 4.80/5  

Dunlop's brass line of picks offers one of the more authentic sounds.

+ - National NP­2B­4PK National NP­2B­4PK

Total of 4.53/5  

Another brass set that features precise build, great comfort and vintage tone

+ - Tone Deaf Music Metal Finger Picks Tone Deaf Music Metal Finger Picks

Total of 4.43/5  

An unusual design, but one that adds a new dimension of tone.

+ - Dunlop 9020TP Dunlop 9020TP

Total of 4.53/5  

Dunlop's synthetic set which brings that mellow sound and a softer response.

+ - aLaska Pik finger picks aLaska Pik finger picks

Total of 4.40/5  

An alternative design to finger picks, which has its benefits and quirks.

Dunlop 37R.018 Brass Fingerpicks

Dunlop 37R.018 Brass Fingerpicks

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Considering how popular they are in the pick industry, it's no surprise that a Dunlop product is at the top of our list. The model we are looking at here offers a mix of modern comfort and classic tone. Made of brass, these picks produce a sharp, but still manageable sound with equal parts warmth and ring. They are .018 gauge, which is fairly thing in general. However, being made of metal means that you won't see too much flex. This pack includes a set of 20 picks altogether, although there are no thumb picks included.

National NP­2B­4PK

National NP­2B­4PK

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Speaking of traditional picks, here is another awesome brass set that puts you right in that vintage category. National's NP­2B­4PK feature a slightly heavier gauge compared to the Dunlop set we have just talked about, coming in at .025 inches. What defines this particular model is durability, comfort and balance. These are capable of withstanding quite frequent use for a ling period of time without coming loose or even worse, falling off. As a bonus point, National is proud of the fact that most of their product is made in USA.

Tone Deaf Music Metal Finger Picks

Tone Deaf Music Metal Finger Picks

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Next in line is a set of four finger picks m ade by Tone Deaf Music. Unlike our previous picks, these are made of stainless steel. This is actually a decent choice of materials if you are looking for longevity and consistency. Another interesting detail is the design of the pick itself. Instead of a solid piece of metal shaped to form a tip, these use a narrow band, fairly rounded band of metal. In other words, it's an open design. Wehther you are playing guitar, banjo, lap steel or other, these will give you that classic sharp tone.

Dunlop 9020TP

Dunlop 9020TP

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Dunlop 9020TP represent our first plastic set. Even though plastics give you a softer response, they are not all that popular due to fitment issues. Dunlop has actually done a great job with 9020TP. You are looking at a fairly good fit and a shape that is comfortable to use. Unlike all of our previous choices, this one actually comes with a thumb pick included. Considering that a lot of players like to run metal finger picks and plastic thumb picks, this is a great package. Overall, you are getting that classic Dunlop quality at a very reasonable price.

aLaska Pik finger picks

aLaska Pik finger picks

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Last but not least, we have the aLaska Pik finger picks. Right off the bat, you can see that this setis noticeably different from the rest. This is because aLaska Pik simulates finger nails. When you put them on, the picking surface acts as a fully grown finger nail, which means that even the more traditional players will feel right at home. This is a 12 pack of large ones, although you can find other sizes as well. Great set of the money.

Conclusion

Finger picks take some getting used to when you start using them. However, it won’t be long before you realize just how much they can add to your tone, technique and overall performance. Models we have listed above are what we consider to be among the best. With that said, as long as you keep the size of the pick in mind, you should have no issues.


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