Top 9 Best Digital Pianos For Classical Pianists

Classical players are a whole different breed. They are trained to meet stricter standards than most when it comes to technique, performance and overall skill. Because of that, they have a slightly stricter set of requirements in terms of musical instruments.

Today we are going to show you our picks for the top 9 best digital pianos for classical players, which should meet these requirements. Needless to say, some of these are among the best digital pianos you can get right now. After we go over our list, we will discuss what makes a good piano in this niche category.

Top 9 Best Digital Pianos For Classical Pianists

ImageDigital Pianos / RatingSummaryCheck Price
+ - Suzuki MDG-4000ts Suzuki MDG-4000ts

Total of 4.90/5   4.9 out of 5 stars

An incredible piano that brings the authentic looks but also the performance.

+ - Yamaha YDP184R Yamaha YDP184R

Total of 4.90/5   4.9 out of 5 stars

One of Yamaha's best models that offers both impressive software and hardware.

+ - Kawai CE220 Kawai CE220

Total of 4.85/5   4.9 out of 5 stars

An impressive feat of engineering that brings all the features you'd need.

+ - Yamaha Arius YDP-181 Yamaha Arius YDP-181

Total of 4.78/5   4.8 out of 5 stars

Another awesome Arius model that packs an impressive performance profile and hardware.

+ - The ONE Smart Piano The ONE Smart Piano

Total of 4.72/5   4.7 out of 5 stars

Something different but ultimately very efficient and helpful for beginner classical players.

+ - Roland F-140R Roland F-140R

Total of 4.55/5   4.6 out of 5 stars

A low profile console model that packs all the heat you'd need.

+ - Casio Privia PX-560 Casio Privia PX-560

Total of 4.55/5   4.6 out of 5 stars

A powerful model from Privia series that packs tremendous performance and hardware.

+ - Casio CGP-700 Casio CGP-700

Total of 4.50/5   4.5 out of 5 stars

Once again Casio proves that they are masters of good, affordable performance.

+ - vidaXL Digital Piano vidaXL Digital Piano

Total of 3.83/5   3.8 out of 5 stars

Affordable model that brings all the necessary features for aspiring classical pianists.

Suzuki MDG-4000ts

Suzuki MDG-4000ts

Design:5 out of 5 stars
Features:5 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.9 out of 5 stars
Value:4.7 out of 5 stars

If you are a classical player, Suzuki MDG-4000ts is probably pressing all of your buttons. This digital piano takes things to a whole new level. Not only did Suzuki nail the aesthetics, but they have also brought the performance side of the equation close to the acoustic sound. Not only that, but playing it feels very authentic. This is mainly thanks to Fatar graded hammer action which is a little miracle of its own. As far as software goes, Suzuki went all out with over 650 voices, 256 GM voices, and a whole array of other presets to boot. The sound engine that handles it all is very fluid in a sense that nothing feels sluggish or forced during use.

Yamaha YDP184R

Yamaha YDP184R

Design:4.9 out of 5 stars
Features:5 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.9 out of 5 stars
Value:4.8 out of 5 stars

Console pianos have been the go to choice for most classical players simply because they bring all of the benefits a digital model has to offer. Yamaha YDP184R from Arius series is a perfect example of a proper console model. It also happens to be the flagship model in the series. At its core you will find Yamaha's CFX Premium Grand Piano Voice, which gives it a tangible edge over its competition. The Virtual Resonance Modeling allows you to make the most out of those voices, especially considering that Graded Hammer 3 action covers the input side of things. This is a top tier console digital piano that brings zero compromises. It is streamlined and catered for pros, by pros.

Kawai CE220

Kawai CE220

Design:4.8 out of 5 stars
Features:5 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.9 out of 5 stars
Value:4.7 out of 5 stars

Kawai is one of those brands that does classy very well. Their CE220 is every bit a statement of style as it is a highly competitive digital piano. As you can tell just by looking at it, CE220 is a console model that features a full scale keyboard and all three pedals. Where things get really interesting is when you take a closer look. The keys are wooden and sit on a graded hammer action AWA PROII, which is fitted with counterbalancing and generally feels incredibly authentic when you play. This piano features 192 note polyphony, 22 awesome voices and a good selection of effects. The Progressive Harmonic Imaging engine ties it all together into a very refined, quality experience.

Yamaha Arius YDP-181

Yamaha Arius YDP-181

Design:4.7 out of 5 stars
Features:4.9 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.8 out of 5 stars
Value:4.7 out of 5 stars

Next inline is another Arius model from Yamaha. This time around we are looking at a YDP-181. The reason why this model is on the list is because Yamaha has managed to win the top spot in every price range. YDP-181 is pound for pound the best rig you can get for this kind of money, hands down. This model brings you that same full scale graded hammer action that has made the entire YDP family popular. It also brings 128 note polyphony, dynamic stereo sampling AWM piano and much more. Best of all, it is a very traditional looking piano. You are still getting that high quality Yamaha design that appeals to the classical player with its conservative aesthetic.

The ONE Smart Piano

The ONE Smart Piano

Design:4.6 out of 5 stars
Features:5 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.7 out of 5 stars
Value:4.6 out of 5 stars

Our next pick represents something completely different but in a good way. The ONE Smart Piano has that classical look to it, but it also comes with some completely unorthodox features. The whole idea about this piano is to make learning easy. It is a full fledged piano in a sense that it comes with a full scale keyboard, all three pedals, the works. However, every key features a subtle but noticeable LED light above it. Combined with their awesome learning software, you can definitely get a very efficient practice session out of this setup. On top of that, you're still getting a great weighted action, a good sound engine and an awesome set of piano samples to work with.

Roland F-140R

Roland F-140R

Design:4.4 out of 5 stars
Features:4.6 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.7 out of 5 stars
Value:4.5 out of 5 stars

When you look at Roland F-140R, it isn't hard to see what makes it so competitive. In many ways it is a niche piano. Roland went with a very slim package that is designed to have a low profile and preserve space. All of that while still retaining the traditional features that appeal to classical players. In other words, you are getting a decent console, a full scale keyboard, all three pedals and more. The sound engine Roland installed in this piano is that same SuperNATURAL we have seen in their flagship models. The action is a PHA-4, which has a proven track record, especially when it comes to velocity tracking. Despite its simple aesthetics, this is a proper workhorse.

Casio Privia PX-560

Casio Privia PX-560

Design:4.2 out of 5 stars
Features:4.7 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.6 out of 5 stars
Value:4.7 out of 5 stars

Casio's Privia series are full of awesome models that are aimed at a wide range of users, including classical players. Privia PX-560 may not have the aesthetics of a traditional piano, but it definitely brings the necessary performance. The entire series is based around offering a good bang for the buck, PX-560 in particular. What you're getting with this package is their Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard, Hex Layer Synthesis technology and a great compilation of voices. One area where this particular model stands out from the rest is the songwriting suite that allows for 17-track recording, USB audio recording and more. If you want all the features of a classical piano in a modern package, this is it.

Casio CGP-700

Casio CGP-700

Design:4.1 out of 5 stars
Features:4.6 out of 5 stars
Sound:4.5 out of 5 stars
Value:4.8 out of 5 stars

As we move into a more affordable segment of the market, we run into Casio CGP-700. This is one of Casio's more streamlined models which was originally designed to be a portable unit. However, in this configuration, it serves very well as a platform that classical piano players can use to a great extent. Casio ships these with that same Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II we have seen numerous times by now, Casio SP33 set of pedals and a fairly sturdy console. As far as software goes, this package includes those same samples you can expect to find in more expensive Casio models. The grand piano samples voicing is on point to say the least. It's a great value choice.

vidaXL Digital Piano

vidaXL Digital Piano

Design:4.1 out of 5 stars
Features:3.7 out of 5 stars
Sound:3.5 out of 5 stars
Value:4 out of 5 stars

Last place on our list goes to a budget setup that is designed for those who are looking for something on the extreme side of affordable. VidaXL's digital piano is essentially a standard console model that features a semi weighted action, full scale keyboard, decent quality keys and a decent software suite to boot. Is it the best option for classical pianists? Definitely not, but it is the best choice for those who are looking to get more for less. It features all three foot pedals and allows you to practice with decent feedback. The sounds aren't going to fool a trained pianist, but they are very close. At this price, you can't really ask for much more than that.

What Defines Digital Pianos Suitable For Classical Players?

The differences between classical players and the rest of the pianist community are very subtle. Classical players are subscribing to a very traditional outlook on certain techniques and hardware. In that sense, it is very hard to find a digital piano that fits their needs considering that there is nothing traditional about a digital piano. However, as you can tell by our list, there are models which fill that niche quite nicely. We have done our best to keep things simple and affordable, but it has proven to be quite hard. Most of the pianos from the list belong to a category that is reserved for advanced players. That brings higher prices. With that said, there are affordable models out there that fit the niche. So, what features make a piano suitable for classical players?

Complete Controls Are a Must


This is a simple requirement but also the most important one. Classical players will insist on having a full scale keyboard that packs a good weighted action and they will need all three pedals. That is the bare minimum. This pretty much excludes most portable pianos right off the bat. Most but not all. The better the weighted action, more suitable the piano is going to be for classical players. That much is obvious. If you can find something that will require you to make no adjustments when switching from an acoustic concert model, you’re in a good place.

Sounds and Voices

The other part of the equation are the voices and sounds. Classical players will need a high level of sound quality and sample finesse. Most of the models on our list come with a hefty price tag exactly because they are packed with some of the best voices and samples. Naturally, your willingness to compromise in this regard is going to bring that price point down. The decision to do so is solely up to you.

Conclusion

Digital pianos that appeal to classical players are almost an oxymoron. Most classical players would much rather look for an acoustic model. However, times are changing and so are pianos. Models you’ve had the chance to see on our list are on higher end side of things. You are looking at top tier hardware as well as software, which has the potential to go toe to toe with acoustic pianos. If you’re a classically trained pianist, you should definitely give these pianos a try. No matter how conservative you are, chances are that you will enjoy playing any of these.


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